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Louisiana Hotels

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2: Searching for hotels in Louisiana. To locate your hotel, click on one of the blue links below.

Louisiana Cities :

 
Alexandria
Arcadia
Baker
Baton Rouge
Bossier
Bossier City
Breaux Bridge
Chalmette
Covington
Crowley
Delhi
Denham Springs
Deridder
Donaldsonville
Eunice
Franklin
Gonzales
Gray
Gretna
Hammond
Harahan
Harvey
Houma
Jennings
Kenner
Kinder
La Place
Lafayette
Lafayette Lousiana
Lake Charles
Laplace
Leesville
Luling
Metaire
Metairie
Minden
Monroe
Monroe Louisana
Morgan City
Natchitoches
Natchitoches Lousiana
Natichitoches
New Iberia
New Orleans
New Orleans Lousiana
Opelousas
Pineville
Port Allen
Rayne
Rayville
Ruston
Scott Louisianna
Shreveport
Slidell
Sulphur
Tallulah
Thibodaux
Ville Platte
Vinton
West Monroe
Winnfield
Winnsboro
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Swathed in the romance of pirates, voodoo and Mardi Gras, LOUISIANA is undeniably special. Its history is barely on nodding terms with the view that America was the creation of the Pilgrim Fathers; its way of life is proudly set apart. This is the land of the rural, French-speaking Cajuns (descended from the Acadians, eighteenth-century French-Canadian refugees), who live in the prairies and swamps in the southwest of the state, and the Creoles of jazzy, sassy New Orleans. (The term Creole covers those born in the state to French and Spanish colonists – famed in the nineteenth century for their masked balls, family feuds and duels – as well as native-born, French-speaking slaves.) Southern Louisiana’s spicy home-cooked food, regular festivals and lilting French-based dialect – and above all its music (jazz, R&B, Cajun and its bluesy black counterpart, zydeco) – draw from all these cultures. North Louisiana – Protestant Bible Belt country, where old plantation homes stand decaying in vast cotton fields – feels more “Southern” than the marshy bayous, shaded by ancient cypress trees and laced with wispy trails of Spanish moss, of the Catholic south.

The French first settled Louisiana in 1682, braving swamps and plagues to harvest the abundant cypress, but the state was sparsely inhabited before its first permanent settlement, the trading post of Natchitoches, was established in 1714. In 1760, Louis XV secretly handed New Orleans, along with all French territory west of the Mississippi, to his Spanish cousin, Charles III, as a safeguard against the British. Louisiana remained Spanish until it was ceded to Napoleon in 1801, under the proviso that it should never change hands again. Just two years later, however, Napoleon, strapped for cash to fund his battles with the British in Europe, struck a bargain with president Thomas Jefferson known as the Louisiana Purchase. This sneaky agreement handed over to the US all French lands between Canada and Mexico, from the Mississippi to the Rockies, for a total cost of $15 million. The subsequent “Americanization” of Louisiana was one of the most momentous periods in the state’s history, with the port of New Orleans, in its key position near the mouth of the Mississippi River growing to become one of the nation’s wealthiest cities. Though the state seceded from the Union to join the Confederacy in 1861, there were important differences between Louisiana and the rest of the slave-driven South. Here, slavery was more in the West Indian mold than the Anglo-American. The Black Code, drawn up by the French in 1685 to govern Saint-Domingue (today’s Haiti) and established in Louisiana in 1724, gave slaves rights unparalleled elsewhere, including permission to marry, meet socially and take Sundays off. The black population of New Orleans in particular was renowned as exceptionally literate and cosmopolitan.

Though Louisiana was not physically scarred by the Civil War, with few important battles fought on its soil, its economy was given a death blow. In time it recovered, benefiting from the rich agricultural land, the mighty Mississippi River and offshore oil. These days, though, the state has become dependent upon tourism, centered around New Orleans and Cajun country. Still, despite all its difficulties, and against all odds, Louisiana remains a unique and intriguing place – upbeat, laid-back, and never less than compelling. Click here to go to Louisiana State web site.

 

 

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